Bollyfoods Specialty Coffee

 8,95

Bollyfoods’ eigen koffie: geproduceerd in Chikmagalur in Hoysala, Karnataka, India en gebrand door Blommers in Nijmegen. 250 gram in luchtdichte zak.

Roast type: espresso.
Taste: chocolate, tobacco, herbal.

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Beschrijving

Bollyfoods’ eigen koffie: geproduceerd in Chikmagalur in Hoysala, Karnataka, India en gebrand door Blommers in Nijmegen. 250 gram in luchtdichte zak.

Roast type: espresso
Taste: chocolate, tobacco, herbal
Region: Karnataka
Town: Chikmagalur
Farm: Hoysala Plantation
Farm size: 90 hectares
Varietals: Bourbon, Catuai, S795, Sarchimor
Altitude: 930 meters above sea level

Hoysala

Hoysala Plantation in located in Angadi village, where the Hoysala Dynasty was founded in the 10th century. Coffee was first planted in the region in the 1920s. The plantation has been owned by the current owners since 1950. Today, the third-generation of family owners focus on meticulous cultivation and processing.

The soil is rich in humus and organic matter that nurture growing coffee trees. Coffee is grown under shade on tiered slopes populated with native plant species, including fruit trees. Over 200 species of animals, birds, insects and reptiles make their home in the canopy. They also grown black pepper, areca (a nut), cardamom and fruit on the plantation.

Cherry is selectively handpicked by local laborers. Lots are kept separate by variety and day harvested. At the on-site mill, workers visually sort cherry by hand before floating all cherry twice to ensure no over or under ripe cherry remain.

Cherry is pulped and separated by density. Coffee is fermented and then washed in clean water. Workers lay parchment and remaining mucilage on breathable fiber mats on patios to sundry. They rake parchment constantly to ensure even drying. Parchment is covered during the hottest part of the day and overnight to protect it from condensation.

Once dry, coffee is placed in jute bags and rested in a well-ventilated store room for 30 to 45 days. Then, coffee is delivered to the dry mill to be hulled and prepared for export.

Coffee in India

Though India is typically perceived as a tea-growing and drinking country, coffee production in the country actually predates tea. Records indicate that coffee first arrived in India in the 1600s, whereas tea did not arrive until more than 200 years later, in 1839. What does unite the two drinks, however, is that the British thirst for cheaper, more plentiful tea and coffee were the major reason that they were both first widely cultivated on plantations across India.

Coffee farms are typically situated between 700 and 1,200 meters above sea level. Most coffee cultivation is ‘traditional’ and two-tier shade canopies are mixed with leguminous, nitrogen-fixing trees. In this method, it is very common for coffee trees to be intercropped with spices (like vanilla or pepper) and fruit trees.

After harvest, which is most often done by hand by family members or hired laborers, cherry is usually processed as Natural or Fully washed. Most farms dry coffee on patios or tables, though some of the larger estates also have mechanical dryers.

Today, approximately 30% of coffee production is consumed internally. The other 70% is prepared for export.